GCIG

 

Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup

gcig logo 210

 

About the collaboration with GCIG (2004)
(copied from GCIG's website http://gcig.igcs.org/index.html) :

Following the fruitful collaboration of two paclitaxel studies (OV9 and EORTC-55931) between European and Canadian investigators, it was felt by the leadership of the EORTC Gynecological Cancer Cooperative Group (GCCG), the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC-CTG), the Nordic Society of Gynecologic Oncology (NSGO), and the Scottish Gynaecological Cancer Trials Group (SGCSG) that further cooperation in a more structured manner was timely. Initial discussions took place at meetings in conjunction with ASCO meetings in 1995 and 1996, followed by in depth discussion (including planned structure) during the EORTC-GCCG meeting in Odense, Denmark on November 21-22, 1997. These discussions led to the birth of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) and to guidelines by which different groups could join in the activities of such a cooperation. Since that time several meetings have taken place to further define its goals, its structure, and its tasks and to agree on a forum of cooperation which would be of benefit for all those participating in this endeavour.

Aims To promote international cooperation

  • To promote clinical research
  • To perform studies in rare tumors
  • To stimulate evidence-based medicine
  • To support educational activities

Over the past four years the interest in this structure has grown and at present the GCIG has grown to include 14 Cooperative Group organizations (AGO, ANZGOG, EORTC, GEICO, GINECO, GOG, JGOG, GONO, MRC, NCIC-CTG, NSGO, RTOG, SGCTG, SWOG) as well as having support from the NCI (United States). There is no doubt that the present explosion of activity on a more global basis is a result of the perception that answers to important questions will be obtained in a timely fashion through this route. The GCIG has evolved as a forum for communication and exchange of ideas, and for the means by which Intergroup collaboration can be fostered. It is clear that the original goals have to be revisited as the forum has outgrown the original concept of a venue for trial planning and development. Rather communication, fostering trial collaboration, and identifying and solving problems in this research area through Working Groups has become the focus. Changes in the statutes to reflect this new reality are anticipated in the next two years.

Elisabeth Avall-Lundquist, M.D., Ph.D.
Chair, GCIG

Monica Bacon
GCIG Secretariat